Tuesday, March 27, 2007

Dibels, the Bible, and NCATE

Here's a link to this week's Time Magazine cover story on the "The Case for Teaching the Bible." No talk of such a course here in New Mexico (none that I'm aware of anyway), although a couple of high schools where we place student teachers have long-standing Bible as Literature courses. Our English education students can take a Bible as Literature course as an option in our program but not many do.

The Washington Post had a long-story on the front page of the Monday edition on testing, including a sidebar about Dibels.

Finally, I spent a good part of yesterday in meetings about our upcoming NCATE visit. Apparently, everyone lives in fear of Standard Two these days. Any stories, thoughts, or advice?

3 comments:

mmoore said...

Don
We had our NCATE visit last year in April and initially passed all areas with the site visit but then our Area 2 was flunked by NCATE about a month later. We wrote a revision and this flunked too. We are now awaiting a decision from NCATE as to whether they will revisit or allow a third rejoinder. University of Georgia and Georgia state initially flunked theirs too but then passed on revision, I think. Our problem is an obtuse dean who is clueless as to what is required at this level.

Don Zancanella said...

Thanks for the comment. My understanding is that the failures have been linked to the lack of a coherent assessment system at the college level (more than at the program level) but that's just what I've heard. The entire process seems somewhat more mysterious this time around than it did in the past

mmoore said...

Don, you are correct, area 2 looks at how the college as a unit takes from the unit the results of the assessments and makes unit decisions. This can be really frustrating in that the process is asking for less faculty governance at this point. The whole exercise was a mess. The visiting team asked the wrong questions. Had no comment about programs that they should have see problems. All they wanted was an easily negotiated evidence room.

Michael